embroidery

The fairies have arrived

Fairies galore

It has been such a busy two months I seem to be ordering supplies, packing kits and going to the post office for most of my working days.  So exciting to be sending my kits to so many different countries.  The all new post office staff in Penzance's sadly moved post office don't seem quite so excited by the number of parcels I'm taking them.  I love to think of all those girls being stitched all over the world!!

Today however my desk is swamped in fairies!  Not the kind that pack kits, order supplies or go to the post office sadly.  In fact they are the kind that sit there reminding me to get on with the stitching.  So, after what has turned out to be a very busy November, I have finally finished the 'fairy with attitude' pattern.

Full black

I love stitching this pattern.  It feels like playtime after all the work stuff.  I love choosing colours (mainly black white and red I've noticed!) and I love embellishing her hair, messing around with sock stripe patterns and wing possibilities ...  Best of all she is deceptively simple

Full red

She can be stitched with an embroidered dress or with an applique dress.  I recommend Liberty tana lawn for the applique as it is such a light strong fabric.  If you are in the UK you can buy small pieces from here at Duck egg threads.

Black silver wing

I think these fairies would make lovely stocking fillers.  I also think a bedroom 'keep out' sign might be fun (or a craft room or a chocolate cupboard...)

I will have some hand stitched versions of these for sale by next week I hope probably in the same cushion form as the lavender girls so they can be hung up as decorations.

I'm also working on that little boy fairy cushion and hope to have a pattern for him next week, still enough time to stitch a fairy cushion before Christmas I hope!

I know quite a few of you are long since started on your Christmas stitching and I hope you are all enjoying it.  I think I may need to start thinking about our family Christmas quite soon too!  A bit of knitting maybe...

x

 


Just a quick reminder

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A couple of years ago I did a short series of blog posts to stitch this little notebook cover for a Christmas lists notebook (being something of a notebook and list fanatic!)

I realised that I don't have a clear link to the posts anymore and Christmas is on the way so I have added a page above to link to any free stuff 

and here is the link to the beginning of the series for anyone who missed it the first time around

lilipopo Christmas stitch along


filling in the spaces with simple stitches

Slow stitching

I am still loving my slow stitching book and taking a little quiet time to stitch some patches.  I'm not quite sure what I intend to do with them at the end of all the stitching but...

It got me thinking that I really do love my stitching to be simple and relaxing.  I'm a huge fan of backstitch because it is so simple and does exactly what I need it to do.  

Wishes head

You can change the kind of line you create by changing the number of strands.  So for something delicate and sketchy like my catching wishes pattern I just used one strand of thread to give it an ethereal feel.

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whereas feeling witchy is much bolder and uses two threads.  I also love filling with back stitch.  This could be because satin stitch is definitely not my strong point but I like the sketchiness of back stitch filler.  And again it is different according to how many strands of threads you use.

So all this has got me thinking about filling the spaces.

Etsy red fairy cover

A lot of the dresses for my girls have fabric appliqued to fill the space but sometimes I like to stitch the space.

So here are a few ideas about how to fill the spaces

Stripes

There are always back stitch stripes, in the friends pattern I have used them for the hat and I often use them for tops and socks but they could also fill a dress nicely.   I have a habit of using three colours, a dark colour, a lighter version and an ecru always seem to work nicely.  You can either alternate them or you could have two rows of one and single rows of the others.   It's fun to mess around and see what effects you get.

Straight

I often just add straight stitches, I tend to prefer this to satin stitch as it's less heavy and seems to suit the girls more

I also used straight stitches in some of the trees below.  I find a pattern forms naturally as I stitch, but I will go back and undo if a stitch looks out of place.  I think a variegated thread would work nicely with these straight stitches.

Trees

for winter dream I used seed stitch for her dress.  I think this is my favourite way to fill dresses.  It's so relaxing, making tiny (1-2mm) stitches, each one running in a different direction to the last.  

I also sometimes like to create patterns in the spaces.  I especially love star stitches, just four single stitches crossing each other as in her scarf above.  Little crosses can suggest a knitted fairisle hat.  You could have rows of crosses and V stitches alternating in different colours.

Pattern

For the little reader I created a pattern for her dress rather than applique it.  I made a blue french knot and then just radiated lemon straight stitches out from it.  There are so many possibilities for filling those dresses and hats with very simple stitches and it's fun to mess around creating patterns with stitches.

I'd be interested to know whether you prefer simple stitching or to be challenged by more complex stitches and do you like creating your own patterns to fill the dresses or do you prefer to applique them?

There are tutorials for back stitch and french knots on my tutorials page

All the patterns area available in my Etsy shop

I will be back on Friday with a gorgeous book review by an embroiderer I love


lavender girl inspiration

Watermarked

Inbetween busyness with dull admin stuff and lots of supplies ordering for the Christmas season this is what I have been doing, having fun with lavender girls.

Dress collage

I love playing around with liberty tana lawn scraps.  I especially love  the turquoise Betsy at the moment.  The fabrics are (in a clockwise direction) grey Mitsi, yellow Kayoko, turquoise Betsy, red June's meadow.  All these are available from Alice Caroline on Etsy .

Head collage

The kits should be ready in a week or so

x


little red and kindred stitches

With flowers

The new issue of Kindred Stitches magazine is out now and it has my embroidery pattern for the sweet little red riding hood above

Kindred Stitches is a digital stitching magazine full of lots of beautiful projects.  You just can pop it on your tablet or computer

This issue is 'red and white' 

it has a beautiful hand embroidery pattern by Kelly Fletcher along with patchwork , fairy toadstools and a tote bag.

Little red angled 2

Little Red is a simple pattern with lots of long short stitch

so if you would like a little extra stitching go take a look at this lovely magazine

x

 

 


winter dream embroidery pattern

Water marked

It's finished.  I really loved the whole process of designing and stitching this one.  I think the soft colours and repetitive stitching were just what I needed this week while I was trying to decide on plans and stock for kits and fabric panels for the upcoming season!

It took quite a lot of drawing, stitching and redrawing to get this one just how I wanted it.  When the children were little I used a lot of Rudolf Steiner/Waldorf methods in their education and I love the peaceful gentle art aesthetic associated with it all.  And I am a big lover of Robert Frost's poetry, one of my favourites being 'stopping by woods on a snowy evening'

Wm horse's head

and of course it was inspired by all the beautiful vintage dala horses out there.  Wouldn't it be lovely to ride off on one into snowy woods on a wintry evening

The pattern is in my shop now and I will be having fabric panels printed with this one later in the month.  I may also offer a kit for it in time for Christmas.

So all in all I'm feeling quite (unseasonably) Christmassy now!  In early October!!  Today I think I will have to go make squash soup and apple cake to get myself back into the autumn rhythm, or I could start my Christmas shopping early, for the first time ever, in my life!

I think soup and apple cake...

x


colour and threads

Colours

Today I have been deciding which colours to use for my new pattern and now I am writing this rather than getting on with the pattern tracing!  Choosing thread colours is probably my absolute favourite part of the whole design process.  In real life I am a wearer of neutrals, greys and blacks so I think lilipopo is where I can release my inner colourful self!

I tend to use either DMC or Anchor stranded cotton because they are usually readily available for most people.  And if you can only get one or the other (usually DMC is more available) there are conversion charts between the two, such as this one at Sew and So.

I do also love the sublime stitching colours but they are not as easy to get hold of so I don't tend to use them for my patterns, although I do use them for personal projects and commissioned work.

Anchor 19

I have my favourite basics, DMC black, DMC white and DMC ecru are always in my box.  Alongside those are DMC3799 a charcoal colour that is great for the girls faces and DMC451 a brown I sometimes use for faces or hair.  Then there is my all time favourite red - Anchor 19, I am always running out of it and nothing else ever seems quite the same.

I also have a tendency to buy the same colour over and over by accident, thinking I am buying a new colour.  I have four skeins of Anchor 168 sitting in my box!

Purples

Then there are the colours that I struggle with a little.  Purples!  These two are my favourite purples and really they are quite close to greys.  I don't use purple very much as I find it quite a difficult colour to work with.  Is it just me?  or do you have colours that you just never really pick up?

Blues greens

So back to choosing colours for my new pattern.  These soft blue green colours have been calling to me and there are some trees in the pattern that would suit.  

Soft

along with these lovely peachy soft colours.  I definitely have a hankering for quite soft colours at the moment which will probably mean that I work this pattern onto white fabric rather than my usual 'natural' essex linen as soft colours can disappear into the natural colour, especially when photographed.

Dala colours wmk

It's a wintry pattern that I hope will be a nice Christmas pattern.  I will have it ready for mid October so lots of time to stitch it before Christmas!  I think I might do a printed fabric panel for it too.

Do you enjoy the colour choosing process or do you prefer to have a list of colours so you can get down to the stitching?

And now back to the pattern tracing or maybe a little while in pinterest land first...

x

 

 


sulky solvi part two

Full wonky shed 32

The wonky shed is finished!  

And the sulky solvi rinsed out without leaking printer ink.  

Bunting

I found using the hoop a little difficult with the sulky solvi as it kept peeling apart, I think I would tack it down if I used it again.

I also found the stitching a little hard going in places, working through 2 pieces of fabric essentially so it was a little stiffer.  The needle didn't really get too gummed up, I just wiped it occasionally.

I soaked the embroidery in luke warm water, it took a little longer than I expected for it to dissolve but it's the first time I've used a stabilizer that dissolves.  Little bits of gummy stuff floated to the top of the sink.  I soaked it three times in fresh water to make sure that there was none left in the embroidery.  It has all disappeared with no nasty ink bleeding.  I used an ink jet printer so I am not sure whether it would be the same for a laser printer.

On the whole I still prefer to use my old pen/light box tracing method because I found the stitching experience wasn't quite what I would like.  But if you hate tracing or have difficulty with tracing I think it's a very viable option.

I used sticky fabri solvy by sulky

and bought it from here

it cost £7.63 + £2.82 postage for 12 sheets

x

Here is part one of the sulky solvi journey 

 


little reader bookmark

Stitching

At the beginning of the year the lovely Kindred Stitches asked me to design a pattern for them which was featured in their beautiful stitchy digital magazine.

Whole

If you missed the magazine you can now purchase the pattern in my shop

The pattern includes instructions for making up the very simple bookmark but I  think she might look lovely on a journal cover too.

And I do have another project coming up in Kindred Stitches soon...


sulky fabri solvy and wonky sheds

Cat stitching

Sulky Fabri Solvy -  it has been sitting on my shelf ever since one of the lovely instagram ladies recommended it to me.  This week I decided to spruce up my wonky shed design ready for printing onto fabric in September and this seemed the perfect opportunity to try the sulky.

Sticky fabri solvy

so it's basically a sticky backed stabilizer that you can put through the printer and then stick to your fabric.  You stitch over it and when you're done simply rinse it away so the pattern disappears and you are left with your beautiful stitching.  It is quite expensive, mine cost £9.91 for twelve sheets.

It went through the printer perfectly and the lines are nice and bold.  I was worried that it would be difficult to stick down smoothly but it wasn't the case it was easy to stick to the fabric

Transferred

I stuck it to my usual Robert Kauffman Essex linen in ivory so there was no problem.  I do want to try it out on felt too though.

I pretty much always stitch using a hoop and was a bit nervous about how well it would sit in the hoop, whether it would come apart from the fabric or shift but it seems okay.  I haven't tightened the hoop as much as I usually would though.

In the hoop

I found that the stitching was a little harder (I really do mean 'a little').  I knew that the needle gets a little sticky and you need to wipe it, which had put me off, but it hasn't happened very much at all.  Back stitch was pretty straight forward.  I think stem stitch might actually be easier to do without the hoop but maybe that's always true!  I started filling the cushions under the cat but to be honest I think I would just stitch all the lines then remove the sulky and do any filling in afterwards.  This is just because the stitching is a little stiffer which makes the filling in a little tedious.

Sleeping cat

I have only done a little bit of my stitching so I will write a second post next week about how it rinses away and the end result.  At the moment it seems a great way to transfer a larger more complicated pattern for anyone who doesn't like transferring or has difficulty with the transfer process.  
So back to my wonky shed stitching

x
Here is part two of my sulky fabri solvy journey